Graphene helps answer noise question

Scientists have solved an almost century-old problem that could further help downscale the size of electronic devices. The work focused on the low-frequency electronic 1/f noise, also known as pink noise and flicker noise. It is a signal or process with a power spectral density inversely proportional to the frequency. It was first discovered in vacuum tubes in 1925 and since then it has been found everywhere from fluctuations of the intensity in music recordings to human heart rates and electrical currents in materials and devices.

Graphene helps answer noise question

Does low-frequency noise occur on the surface or in the bulk of a device?

Thu 14 Mar 13 from Nanotechweb

Multilayer Graphene Films Help Probe Low-Frequency Electronic Noise

A University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering professor and a team of researchers published a paper today that shows how they solved an almost century-old problem that ...

Fri 8 Mar 13 from AZoNano

Improving electronics by solving nearly century-old problem

Scientists have solved an almost century-old problem that could further help downscale the size of electronic devices. The work focused on the low-frequency electronic 1/f noise, also known ...

Thu 7 Mar 13 from ScienceDaily

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