Atomic-scale capillaries block smallest ions, thanks to graphene

Researchers at The University of Manchester's National Graphene Institute in the UK have succeeded in making artificial channels just one atom in size for the first time. The new capillaries, which are very much like natural protein channels such as aquaporins, are small enough to block the flow of smallest ions like Na+ and Cl- but allow water to flow through freely. As well as improving our fundamental understanding of molecular transport at the atomic scale, and especially in biological systems, the structures could be ideal in desalination and filtration technologies.

Atomic-scale capillaries block smallest ions, thanks to graphene

Researchers at The University of Manchester's National Graphene Institute in the UK have succeeded in making artificial channels just one atom in size for the first time. The new capillaries, ...

Fri 11 Jan 19 from Phys.org

Atom-thin graphene water pipes

Narrowest ever capillaries fit only single water molecules while salts are excluded

Mon 14 Jan 19 from Chemistry World

“Atomic-scale Lego” creates single-atom width capillaries that act like natural protein channels

National Graphene Institute makes pores that admit water but block smallest ions, which could have implications for desalination and filtration technologies Sir Andre Geim, co-discoverer of ...

Fri 11 Jan 19 from The Engineer

Graphene Monolayers Allow Atomic-Scale Capillaries to Block Smallest Ions

For the first time, scientists at The University of Manchester’s National Graphene Institute in the United Kingdom have successfully created artificial channels that measure only a single ...

Mon 14 Jan 19 from AZoNano

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